No Poverty

The persistence of energy poverty: A dynamic probit analysis

Submitted by Eugenia Leon on 29 July 2020

This paper contributes to the growing literature on energy poverty in developing countries. We use a dynamic probit estimator on three rounds of panel data from urban Ethiopia to estimate a model of the probability of being energy poor and to investigate the persistence of energy poverty. We also study the impact of energy price in!ation,which Ethiopia experienced during 2007–2009, on energy use and energy poverty.We"nd strong evidence of state dependence in energy poverty. A household that is energy poor in one round is up to 16% more likely to be energy poor in the subsequent round.

Energy

Aid, Collective Action and Benefits to Smallholders: Evaluating the World Food Program’s Purchase for Progress Pilot 20-19

Submitted by Eugenia Leon on 29 June 2020

Smallholder farmers often face prohibitive transaction costs in agricultural commodity markets in developing countries. Consequently, they are only partly integrated into these markets.

Agriculture, Policy Design

The Persistence of Energy Poverty: A Dynamic Probit Analysis 20-16

Submitted by Eugenia Leon on 10 June 2020

This paper contributes to the growing literature on energy poverty in developing countries. We use a dynamic probit estimator on three rounds of panel data from urban Ethiopia to estimate a model of the probability of being energy poor and to investigate the persistence

Energy

Social Protection and Vulnerability to Nutrition Security among Male and Female Headed Households in Ethiopia 20-05

Submitted by Eugenia Leon on 13 May 2020

This study examines the role of Ethiopia’s productive safety net program (PSNP) and its modes of benefit transfer in vulnerability to nutritional outcomes among female- and male-headed households

Gender, Health

Weather at Different Growth Stages, Multiple Climate Smart Practices and Farm Level Risks: Panel Data Evidence from the Nile Basin of Ethiopia 20-04

Submitted by Eugenia Leon on 13 May 2020

The present study investigates the effects of combinations of climate smart agricultural practices on risk exposure and cost of risk. We do this by examining the different risk components – mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis – in a multinomial treatment effects framework by controlling weather variables for key stages of crop growth. We found that adoption of combinations of practices is widely viewed as a risk reducing insurance strategy that can increase farmers’ resilience to production risk.

Agriculture