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Ethiopia

2015-10-13

Agricultural values of the wild coffee genetic resource in Ethiopia: implication for conservation of the wild coffee forest in southwestern Ethiopia

This paper is focuses on assessing the agricultural value of wild coffee genetic resource in view of local coffee producers. Specifically, it is to estimate their demand for improved coffee planting material with respect to coffee production constraints the farmers are facing. Three sites are considered based on variability in coffee production systems. It includes the forest communities keeping wild coffee types, semi-forest coffee types, and areas where coffee production is exclusively dependent upon improved types.

2014-06-03

Adaptation to Increase Resilience to Climate Change in Ethiopian Agriculture: Empowering Farmers to Adopt the Right Water Management Technologies for their Farms

Climate change in Ethiopia will not only increase rainfall variability and lead to more frequent droughts and higher risk of rain generated floods, it will also continue to intensify the degradation of soil fertility that causes agricultural productivity to decline. Adaptation measures that build upon improved water management and enhance soil fertility are fundamental in boosting overall resilience to climate change in the Blue Nile Basin.

2013-04-24

Local Institutions and Better Forests: Empirical Evidence from Household Data

This research aims to enhance informed policy-making and sustainable management of natural resources in Ethiopia through furthering our understanding of the factors that contribute to success (better outcome in forest commons). The research intends to investigate the interplay between the user characteristics, resource characteristics, and the institutional regime as they determine better forest outcome at a more deeper level using household level dataset. 

2013-01-02

Economy Wide Impact of the Electricity Sector in Ethiopia

As a result of growing demand for electricity and recognizing the critical role played by the energy sector in the economic growth and development process, the Government of Ethiopia has already embarked on large scale hydroelectricity projects in view of developing renewable and sustainable energy sources. The goal of this project is to contribute to the fulfillment of these efforts in expanding modern energy access and reducing energy poverty through accelerating the growth of the economy.

2012-02-27

Profitability and Economy-wide Impact of Biofuel Investments in Ethiopia

Given the volatility of world oil prices and the recent all time high, which increased their popularity, bio-fuels have received a great deal of attention globally. The central questions of interest include whether this will have a positive or a negative impact on smallholder farmers and people living in rural areas, as more agricultural land will be used for biofuels production? And what is the effect of these large scale biofuels investments on growth and poverty reduction endeavors of poor countries?

2012-02-27

Natural Resources Degradation and Household Welfare in Rural Ethiopia

Natural resources, agriculture and human activities are highly interrelated in most developing countries in general and Ethiopia in particular. Land clearing for agriculture, increase in demand for fuel wood and construction material, illegal settlement within forests, logging and the expansion of illegal trade have resulted in the deterioration of forest resources, reduction of biodiversity, incidences of soil erosion and land degradation in the country. These will increase the demand for family labor to provide essential resources such as fuel wood, fodder, and water for humans and livestock.

2012-02-27

Local Common Property Systems in Ethiopia: An Empirical Analysis of the Link between User Characteristics, Resource Characteristics and Institutional Regime

Renewable natural resources such as forests, fisheries, grazing lands, soils, groundwater, etc, most of which fall under the category of common pool resources, constitute a significant part of our planet. Common-pool resources (CPRs) constitute important sources of livelihoods to many people in developing countries including timber, fuelwood, grazing, irrigation water, and domestic water.

2012-02-01

Determinants of Farm Households’ Agro-Forestry Technology Adoption in Ethiopia

Empirical evidences from developing countries indicate that forest products play a significant role in rural livelihoods, particularly for the rural poor. Forests provide benefits in the form of wood, food, income, and watershed protection which enable people to secure stable and adequate food supply. However, deforestation and the resulting environmental degradation is a major problem in most African countries including Ethiopia. This is considered as one of the key factors challenging food security, community livelihood and sustainable development. Reports on the forest resources of Ethiopia are dominated by the alarming deforestation that goes on unabated and at an accelerating rate. The magnitude of deforestation and land degradation by far exceeds the conservation activities being carried out.

2011-02-04

Review of local common pool resource management institutions in Ethiopia

Renewable natural resources such as forests, fisheries, grazing lands, soils, groundwater, etc, most of which fall under the category of common pool resources, constitute a significant part of our planet. Common property resources constitute important sources of livelihoods to many people in developing countries including timber, fuelwood, grazing, irrigation water, and domestic water.

2011-02-04

Impact of Biofuel Investment on the External Sector, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Ethiopia: CGE Analysis

Given the volatility of world oil prices and the recent all time high, which increased their popularity, bio-fuels have received a great deal of attention globally. The central question in here is whether this will have a positive or a negative impact on smallholder farmers and people living in rural areas, as more agricultural land will be used for biofuels production? While some designate it as a crime against humanity, some others have argued that a greater production of biofuels will not necessarily be harmful for the poor and that they can become more food secure with the adoption of proper production technology.

2011-02-04

Common Property Forest Management: Implications for REDD in Ethiopia

The proposed project seeks to contribute substantively to climate change and community forest management policies and advance the literature by analyzing the relationship between common property forest management (CPFM) in Ethiopia and climate policy within the context of the UN Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD) and proposing instruments for channeling REDD benefits to households.

2010-03-26

Impact of land certification on tree growing on private plots of rural households: evidence from the Amhara region of Ethiopia

Sustained agricultural growth is important for poverty reduction in Africa due to the significant role of the sector in the continent. The performance of agriculture depends, among others, on appropriate investment in the sector and the latter is constrained by a multitude of factors including land tenure insecurity. In the presence of tenure insecurity, the risk of losing land will create a disincentive to undertake investments when the present value of the productivity benefits from such investments would, under full tenure security, be higher than their cost.

2010-03-26

Impact of Biofuel Investment on Growth and Poverty Reduction in Ethiopia: CGE Analysis

Given the volatility of world oil prices and the recent all time high, which increased their popularity, bio-fuels have received a great deal of attention globally. The central question in here is whether this will have a positive or a negative impact on smallholder farmers and people living in rural areas, as more agricultural land will be used for biofuels production?

2009-10-19

Urban energy transition and technology adoption: the case of Tigrai, northern Ethiopia

Deforestation in Ethiopia has resulted in growing fuel scarcity and higher firewood prices in urban centers. Urban centers have long been dependent on the rural hinterlands for their fuel. The use of biofuels of rural origin covers about 90% of the urban fuel use. The dependence of urban centers on their rural hinterlands has aggravated the deforestation. One response to reducing the pressure of urban centers on their rural hinterlands could be through substitutions between or switching from one fuel to another, i.e., through energy transition. For example, through substituting away or switching from fuelwood to electricity. Electricity as cooking fuel is cleaner and do not cause deforestation.

2009-10-19

Crop Biodiversity and Food Security in the Highlands of Ethiopia

Production risk is one of the quintessential features of agriculture in Ethiopia. Unpredictable weather can expose farm households to significant production uncertainty and serious hardship. Under harsh climatic and agro-ecological conditions, this can result in food insecurity and famine. During the last 40 years, Ethiopia has experienced many severe droughts leading to production levels that fell short of basic subsistence levels for many farm households (REST and NORAGRIC 1995, p. 137). Harvest failure due to drought is the most important cause of risk-related hardship of Ethiopian rural households, with adverse effects on farm household consumption and welfare (Dercon 2004, 2005). When facing prospects of harvest failure, ex ante farm production decisions, such as crop or varietal choice, remain a part of risk-management strategies (Just and Candler 1985; Fafchamps 1992; Chavas and Holt 1996; Dercon 1996; Smale et al. 1998). In dry environments, farmers’ reliance on crop biodiversity is an essential part of ex ante risk management strategies. Thus, the conservation of relevant germplasms is instrumental to hedge against weather related uncertainty.

2009-07-06

Household forest values under varying management regimes in rural Ethiopia

Ethiopia’s forest cover is estimated at less than 4% of the total land area of about 1 million km2. The consequences of deforestation and forest degradation include reduced agricultural production and decreased household welfare. The Ethiopian government promulgated a forest proclamation and approved the first forest policy in 2007. In its recent comprehensive plan referred to as Plan for Accelerated and Sustained Development to End Poverty (PASDEP), the government also indicated its plan to increase forest cover from about 4% to 9% over a period of five years. The reality on the ground suggests that there is continuing deforestation and mismanagement of existing forests. The government has acknowledged in its forestry laws and regulations that depletion of these resources have resulted in reduced agricultural productivity and subsequently reduced quality of life of the rural people. Moreover, frequent restructuring of the main government body responsible for natural resources in general and forestry in particular meant different levels of attention paid to the sector with its implications for staffing and continuity of programs.

2015-10-13

Environment and Climate Research Center information flyer

The Environment and Climate Research Center aims to support green and climateresilient development. The center is based at the Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI). The other two partner organizations behind the center are the Environment for Development Initiative (EfD) and the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI).

2018-07-17

Cost of Power Outages for Manufacturing Firms in Ethiopia: A Stated Preference Study

Having a reliable supply of electricity is essential for the operation of any firm. In most developing countries, however, electricity supply is highly unreliable. In this study, we estimate the cost of power outages for micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, using a stated preference survey. We find that the willingness to pay, and thus the cost of power outages, is substantial. The estimated willingness to pay for a reduction of one power outage corresponds to a tariff increase of 16 percent.

2018-07-17

Fishing community preferences and willingness to pay for alternative developments of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) for Lake Naivasha, Kenya

Ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) is an important complement to existing fisheries management approaches to maintain ecosystem health and function; to translate goals and aspirations for sustainability into operational objectives, the preferences of the fishing communities should be considered for successful implementation of EBFM. This study analysed the preferences of the fishing community for alternative EBFM developments for Lake Naivasha, Kenya, and estimated the willingness to pay, using a choice experiment approach.

2018-06-25

EfD Ethiopia Annual Report 2017

The EfD Ethiopia Report 2017 gives you an excellent overview of the centres´ achievements during 2017 ranging from interesting policy stories on how economic research is put to use around the world to collaborative research programs, a wide range of publications, and our academic capacity efforts. 

2018-05-21

Determinants of enterprises use of energy efficient technologies: Evidence from urban Ethiopia

This paper examines the determinants of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises’ adoption of energy efficiency practices and technologies, using cross-sectional data of 8174 randomly selected enterprises from ten major urban areas of Ethiopia. For identification, the study relys on a generalized ordered probit model. The findings reveal that, as the size of the enterprise becomes larger, it is more likely the enterprise will undertake energy efficient practices and technologies.

2018-04-19

Climate-Smart Agricultural Practices and Welfare of Rural Smallholders in Ethiopia: Does Planting Method Matter?

The purpose of this study is to provide empirical evidence on the impact of a climate-smart agricultural practice (row planting) on the welfare of rural households. Data collected from 260 households in the North Wollo Zone of Ethiopia were analyzed using Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and a semi-parametric Local Instrumental Variable (LIV) version of the generalized Roy model. The results from the PSM revealed that adoption of row planting technology has a positive and significant impact on per capita consumption and on crop income per hectare.

2018-04-19

Do safety net transfers improve household diets and reduce undernutrition? Evidence from rural Ethiopia

This paper examines the impact of the Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program on household dietary diversity and child nutrition using both waves of the Ethiopian Socioeconomic Survey. The study uses various methodologies, to estimate the effect of the program on household dietary diversity, it relys on the exogeneity of the change in the amount of money that kebeles (lowest administrative unit) have available to allocate among program beneficiaries, which depends on donor support. It presents evidence that there is a discrete jump in the kebeles’ allocated budget between 2012 and 2014.

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